Typical weight of a No 1 rig?

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Dave Pickett
Posts: 107
Joined: 18 Oct 2010, 19:33
Sail number: GBR3845
Club: Eastbourne
Design: TS2 and Shiraz

Typical weight of a No 1 rig?

Post by Dave Pickett » 14 Dec 2010, 11:29

As per the title really, trying to assess the likely all up weight of my Spirit build, can anyone give me the typical weight perhaps including the mast and deck fittings?

(begining to feel this is almost a one man forum, why do so few bother to post on here?)

TedFlack
Posts: 11
Joined: 15 Dec 2009, 15:21

Re: Typical weight of a No 1 rig?

Post by TedFlack » 14 Dec 2010, 13:24

Take a look at this. It has all the weights listed from Anders Wallin.

http://www.anderswallin.net/wp-content/ ... 03july.pdf

I don't know why it is so quiet on this Forum, here in the northern and eastern parts of the USA it is too cold to type.

Dave Pickett
Posts: 107
Joined: 18 Oct 2010, 19:33
Sail number: GBR3845
Club: Eastbourne
Design: TS2 and Shiraz

Re: Typical weight of a No 1 rig?

Post by Dave Pickett » 15 Dec 2010, 22:14

Thanks Ted, that's really useful. Might be struggling to get down to 4kg with a hull weight of 818 grams but we shall see.....

Ian Stead
Posts: 6
Joined: 17 Nov 2010, 11:59
Sail number: GBR90
Design: Lintel

Re: Typical weight of a No 1 rig?

Post by Ian Stead » 15 Dec 2010, 23:37

Hi Dave,

a few tricks to get the weight down.

1. Lipo batteries (45g)
2. Eugle winch (very light but not as good as an RMG)
3. Mini Servo

On the rig, it is not difficult to get the 'A' rig down to 280g if you use the right mast,booms and fittings on the rig

Dave Pickett
Posts: 107
Joined: 18 Oct 2010, 19:33
Sail number: GBR3845
Club: Eastbourne
Design: TS2 and Shiraz

Re: Typical weight of a No 1 rig?

Post by Dave Pickett » 16 Dec 2010, 09:10

Thanks Ian,

I am on the way!

I have a Eurgle winch (46 grams) and either a 5KGcm, or 7 kgcm pull servo for the rudder (both about 45 grams) but in the meantime have ordered these for my Magic Micro

http://www.servoshop.co.uk/index.php?pi ... area=Servo

with 4.6 kg pull they appear to be ok for the sails and rudder on the MM maybe I could use one on the Spirit's rudder (only 16 grams!)

I have a 1300 mah lipo (65 grams) and a bec at 6 grams.

I am being careful with weight, but as this is my first IOM I am primarily concerned with getting everything lined up properly, and making the boat strong and reliable.

Weight is a factor, but from my research so far 100 grams or so over (which I hope not to be) will make so little difference as to be unnoticeable.

Am working on installing the keel and keel box at the moment, what a nerve wracking exercise!!!!

Bruce Andersen
USA NCA Officer
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Sail number: USA 16
Club: Famous Potatoes Sailing Club
Location: USA 16

Re: Typical weight of a No 1 rig?

Post by Bruce Andersen » 17 Dec 2010, 02:21

If you can borrow a laser level (the kind that project a perfectly straight red line onto the walls & ceiling) your alignment task will be made considerably easier.
Bruce Andersen - USA 16

Dave Pickett
Posts: 107
Joined: 18 Oct 2010, 19:33
Sail number: GBR3845
Club: Eastbourne
Design: TS2 and Shiraz

Re: Typical weight of a No 1 rig?

Post by Dave Pickett » 17 Dec 2010, 11:03

Interesting idea Bruce, thanks Was planning on using a normal spirit level (how appropriate!) across the hull to get it level then along the side and front of the keel to make sure the keel box is absolutely lined up. am then planning to "tack" the keel box in place then remove the keel and finish the joint with epoxy and embed some glass fibre tape in with it.

Couple of ply triangular braces on the side and the job should be done. Not looking forward to this aspect of the build, its the one bit that is really critical. (I cut slightly too much off the top of the keel, which I corrected by epoxying a small piece of cf in the front of the keel box, this also corrected the fore/aft alignment of the keel so it wasnt a big disaster, but for those in process of build this can be a very tricky task!)

Ralph Knowles
Posts: 35
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Location: Dundee, Scotland, GBR1876/ GBR 2182/GBR 2167/GBR 1907/GBR 3367
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Re: Typical weight of a No 1 rig?

Post by Ralph Knowles » 18 Dec 2010, 13:56

Hi Dave,

A wee warning here. Don't cut fast and loose with the carbon fibre as a permanant part of the hull. Its a no-no. CF is OK for fin and rudder and for some mast fittings such as kicker and sheeting post but even here the sheeting post tube which is bonded into the hull must either be glass/epoxy or aluminium.
Maybe be better to bond any correction material directly to the fin, so that it then becomes part of a legal removable part.

Ralph

Sen. Measurer (Scot. Dist.)
Bring on the Breeze!

Ralph

Bruce Andersen
USA NCA Officer
Posts: 761
Joined: 25 Nov 2003, 00:06
Sail number: USA 16
Club: Famous Potatoes Sailing Club
Location: USA 16

Re: Typical weight of a No 1 rig?

Post by Bruce Andersen » 18 Dec 2010, 20:18

Hi Dave

Lasers work great and are perfectly sized to fit under the Christmas tree - print out this post and leave it somewhere for your spouse/kids/Santa to see. Suggest that they get one that shoots both a horizontal and vertical line at the same time. Auto-leveling is a nice bonus feature. You can also hang pictures and cabinets with it (see how easy it is to justify getting more man-toys?)

With the boat in the stand, I align one of the beams along the hull's midline to figure out where the keel box should go. The hull design should specify where the leading edge of it should be. Tack the keel box in the appropriate fore/aft position on the laser defined midline with some CA

Flip the hull over, place a bright light under it so it shines through the keelbox. Get a Dremel tool, some magnifying glasses, and a steady hand, then cut the hole for the keel as defined by the shadow of the keel box.

Get or borrow one of the lasers that project both vertical & upright lines simultaneously.

Put your boat in a stand, and put a straightedge across the chainplates to establish a horizontal plane of reference.

Align the straightedge with the horizontal laser beam.

Put something straight in the keel box that projects below the keel a foot or so (a keel will do).

Center the vertical laser beam athwartships, and it will help you decide when the keel is vertical.

Don't use the hull as a horizontal plane of reference, just in case it's a bit off - you really only care that the keel/rudder are square to the rig.

Adjust the keel box (by aligning the protruding keel with the vertical laser) so it's perfectly square to the chainplates.

Ditto with the rudder shaft housing.

Tape the keelbox so it can't move, then take out the keel and glue up the keelbox with whatever alignment struts you choose.

You can then set up the laser with the horizontal beam on the waterline and the vertical beam can help you align the leading edge of the keel (vertical or whatever the designer specifies) now that the keel box is glued in perfectly vertical.

Shape the keel head to align the leading edge of the keel to your specifications.

Have a beer and go out sailing.

Be careful though - if you neighbors see you prancing about in the shop at night with the lights down low and laser beams shooting around they may call the authorities!
Last edited by Bruce Andersen on 19 Dec 2010, 00:51, edited 1 time in total.
Bruce Andersen - USA 16

Hiljoball
Posts: 272
Joined: 06 Jan 2006, 00:47
Sail number: CAN 307
Design: V8
Location: CAN

Re: Typical weight of a No 1 rig?

Post by Hiljoball » 18 Dec 2010, 20:34

To add to what Bruce has said, here is one additional suggestion to avoid disturbing the fin box by removing the fin during setup.

I taped the fin around where it exits the hull with two inch mylar packing tape, and coated that with parting agent. Then I left the fin in place while the epoxy sets up around the fin box. As the epoxy does not stick to the tape, it was easy to pop out the fin after the fin box was cured.

John
John Ball
CRYA #895
IOM CAN 307 V8
In my private capacity

Dave Pickett
Posts: 107
Joined: 18 Oct 2010, 19:33
Sail number: GBR3845
Club: Eastbourne
Design: TS2 and Shiraz

Re: Typical weight of a No 1 rig?

Post by Dave Pickett » 19 Dec 2010, 13:49

Really good helpful advice there guys, thanks, much appreciated.

Ralph, Thats a fair point, which actually hadnt occurred to me. The piece of cf that i have glued inside the fin box is 1/16th dia and about 1/4" long so small I doubt it will be noticed, and it is in no way attempting to make use of CF's strength/weight it's just a spacer.

Guess if I get a really picky measurer I can file it out and replace it with something else, or as you suggest glue something to the keel itself.

Build is temporarily on hold while I build a micro magic!

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